Speech Language Pathology Team
Speech Therapy
slp group photo

Speech-Language Pathologists are responsible for meeting the communication needs of students as indicated on the Individual Education Plan(IEP). Speech-language pathologists’ roles and responsibilities include prevention, identification, evaluation, and intervention of communication disorders including speech (articulation/phonology, voice, fluency), communication, spoken language, hearing, and swallowing. Ultimately, the purpose of the school-based speech-language pathologist is to facilitate functional and measurable change in a student's communication so that the student may participate as fully as possible in educational, social, or vocational settings

*TCSE contracts qualified, licensed SLPs through Presence Learning to meet current unfilled vacancies

Speech-Language Services in TCSE Programs

The speech-language pathologist plays an important team role in the needs of students with disabilities placed in TCSE programs for educational instruction. The type frequency or model of service delivery may vary. The program's special education curriculum guides the SLP in identifying services or supports needed to the student or staff and caregivers.

The RISE program for students with profound disabilities works toward gains in core foundational skills and all developmental areas including communication. The SLP’s role in supporting students placed for educational instruction in this program is to offer skilled speech-language consultation and training; as well as, direct therapy. Using the Communication Matrix is used to assess, identify and develop communication skills through the earliest stages to more formal language systems. The communication matrix represents four areas or reasons for communicating through seven levels of competence and skills.: to refuse something to obtain something to engage in social interaction, and to provide or seek information The identification trial and use of assistive technology, to access information and participate in routine tasks The implementation and embedded use of augmentative and alternative visual or tangible communication systems to support non-verbal students is a large focus of the SLP in supporting students in this program. Coordination with classroom staff and other related service professionals for embedded intervention is critical to making consistent gains in communicating and increasing self-determination. Indirect support for identifying opportunities and establishing accommodations, technology, and strategies to support staff and students is a major focus of the SLP in this program.

The Communication Development program is designed for children with severe communication deficits. The program methodology is based on applied behavior analysis uses a multi-modal approach to teaching and learning including a high level of visual supports and augmentative alternative communication systems. The CD program teaching staff address core foundational skills like imitation, following commands, compliance, and emotional composure through conscious discipline. The SLP’s role in this program is to offer skilled speech-language consultation and training; as well as, direct therapy targeting: -verbal production augmented with picture or object-based -communication systems and voice output technology -functional communication ( gaining attention, accepting, rejecting, requesting, commenting, seeking information, giving information, responding, social reciprocal interaction) and, -social communication/interaction TCSE programs rely heavily on other special educators within the classroom to implement communication strategies throughout everyday activities to ensure embedded intervention within natural and functional routines and interactions.

The Choices program develops daily living skills and functional communication within routines, natural occurring contexts (school, home, community), and activities that will directly benefit the students and support access to information and experiences. The SLP’s role in this program is to offer skilled speech-language consultation and training; as well as, direct therapy targeting ; -functional communication ( gaining attention, accepting, rejecting, requesting, commenting, seeking information, giving information, responding, social reciprocal interaction) -social communication/interaction and -self-advocacy/determination This program recognizes that students with disabilities may require accommodations, strategies and supports that follow them through life in the transition from school to the community. The early goal for the SLP is to teach new functional speaking and listening skills, when developmentally cognitively or physiologically appropriate, and then transition to indirect support through identifying accommodations, strategies or establishing the use of assistive technology that may be needed throughout life in order to communicate, respond and engage in social activities.

The ASPIRE program serves the educational needs of students who have not been successful in traditional school programs because of chronic behavioral, emotional, and/or social choice-making difficulties. Instruction emphasizes taking responsibility for one’s own behavior and learning to accept consequences for one’s own actions. The school utilizes staff training and practices that are consistent with Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) Best Practices in order to teach students pro-social choice-making and maximize their education

The role of the SLP in this program is to identify and treat speech-language disorders to their fullest potential. This includes areas of voice, fluency, spoken language, and speech intelligibility. Placement in this program offers students with social-emotional deficits embedded social work services to provide interventions and strategies addressing feelings, empathy, self-esteem, anger, composure and emotional regulation. The SLP’s focus is targeted at the grade level common core standards for speaking and listening. Support for pragmatic or social communication (conversational skills, non-verbal communication cues, and problem-solving) can be provided in conjunction with the program social workers use to address SEL standards across environments. Targeting social communication deficits requires natural peer context and developing self-awareness/ social cognition, in order to practice skills. Some pre-teaching of specific social communication skills through therapy may or may not be required in addition to the indirect consultation provided to support the classroom staff in embedding social communication opportunities within the daily context of social situations and issues as they arise naturally.

The Early Childhood program is designed for children 3-5 yrs of age with deficits in one or more developmental areas that interfere with their ability to participate in general education preschool environments. The SLP’s role in this program is to offer skilled speech-language consultation and training; as well as, direct therapy targeting developmentally appropriate communication skills identified through the Early Learning Standards in speaking and listening; -speech sound production and intelligibility -spoken language ( expressive and receptive language skills) -functional communication ( gaining attention, accepting, rejecting, requesting, commenting, seeking information, giving information, responding, social reciprocal interaction) -social communication/interaction -voice or fluency

Ear Nose and Throat -Otolaryngologist
ear nose and throat

David Mann, M.D. SIH Ear Nose and Throat 3316 Patriot Court Herrin, Il 62948 618-993-0307

SIH Medical Group   at Center for Medical Arts Carbondale, I.l 62901 (618) 549-5361

Jacques Papazian, M.D.   @ Marshall Browning Hosptial 900 N. Washington St. P. O. Box 192 DuQuoin, IL 62832 (618)-542-2146